Contemplating Japanese Investment During These Devastating Times Monday, Mar 14 2011 

Contemplating Japanese Investment During These Devastating Times

Why I am Bearish on Financial Stocks Friday, Aug 28 2009 

After seeing quite a large rally from the March lows the market appears to be extended and indicators (stocks above 200 day moving average, market PE, bullish/bearish %’s) are signaling some rough seas ahead. While stock could conceivably move higher there are a few reasons why I am bearish at the present time.

Harkening back to 2007, I would like to give credit and thanks to Credit Suisse for the following graph.

As one can see the initial tsunami of bad loans has receded and financial stocks have been licking their wounds and repairing their balance sheets but we are at the beginning of the second wave. This second wave of option reset mortgages will do more damage because of the already weakened state of banks.

The relaxing of mark to market rules has helped repair balance sheets but there will continue to be problems throughout 2010 and into 2011 until the 2nd wave of resets recede.

As the resets continue, non-performing loans continue to rise, causing additional strain on an already weakened banking sector. It is unlikely that we will see a significant drop off in non-performing loans until the bulk of the option resets are completed.

Bank failures continue on a weekly basis with the problems being felt mainly by small and medium sized institutions. Some larger weakened institutions have succumbed to the pressure as well. Recent comments that the FDIC may need additional capital should sound a warning bell across the financial space.

While the housing data has been bullish due to buyers assistance programs, one needs to keep in mind that the reported figures are month-over-month data, not year-over-year. As we get into the fall and winter months the MoM figures will decrease as seasonal patterns take place.

Housing inventories continue at a high level, with many homes being taken off market and rented until the selling climate improves. As we continue through the resets, it is likely that inventories stay high until the potential overhang from option and agency ARM’s clears. Any spurt in new home construction will slow the housing inventories from being worked off in a timely manner.

Retail sales numbers continue to be disappointing, although we are entering a period where comparisons will be much easier. The year over year data shows a 9.4% decline in June and an 8.3% decline in July. Again the YoY data is more telling than the MoM data.

High levels of unemployment will constrain spending and GDP growth into 2010 and later. Government stimulus programs will provide the necessary counterbalance to weakness in consumer spending helping to guide the economy through this difficult period.

This is not an approval for the governments polices but one needs to note that a similar path is followed in every recession. The authors problem lies in the wasteful programs and high deficit levels that state and federal governments carried coming into the recession which only exacerbates the problem going forward. Spending that is targeted at areas to provide future growth is preferred over the construction of dog parks.

So while global economies are likely to come out of the recession without much problem (Japan will be an exception) GDP growth in the US is likely to be below normal levels.

Inventory restocking will give a bump to GDP growth in the coming quarter as will government stimulus programs. This combination will set the stage for renewed consumer and business confidence in the coming years but first we will need to get through the a possible double dip recession in 2010.

So while the market itself may move higher I see better value and higher upsides in the precious metals and agriculture sectors where there are some very interesting values globally. Quite often the best values are off the beaten path.

Disclaimer
Communications are intended solely for informational purposes. Statements made should not be construed as an endorsement, either expressed or implied. This article and the author is not responsible for typographic errors or other inaccuracies in the content. This article may not be reproduced without credit or permission from the author. We believe the information contained herein to be accurate and reliable. However, errors may occasionally occur. Therefore, all information and materials are provided “AS IS” without any warranty of any kind. Past results are not indicative of future results.
PAST RESULTS ARE NOT INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS. THERE IS RISK OF LOSS AS WELL AS THE OPPORTUNITY FOR GAIN WHEN INVESTING IN THE STOCK, BOND, AND DERIVATIVE MARKETS. WHEN CONSIDERING ANY TYPE OF INVESTMENT, INCLUDING HEDGE FUNDS, YOU SHOULD CONSIDER VARIOUS RISKS INCLUDING THE FACT THAT SOME PRODUCTS: OFTEN ENGAGE IN LEVERAGING AND OTHER SPECULATIVE INVESTMENT PRACTICES THAT MAY INCREASE THE RISK OF INVESTMENT LOSS, CAN BE ILLIQUID, ARE NOT REQUIRED TO PROVIDE PERIODIC PRICING OR VALUATION INFORMATION TO INVESTORS, MAY INVOLVE COMPLEX TAX STRUCTURES AND DELAYS IN DISTRIBUTING IMPORTANT TAX INFORMATION, ARE NOT SUBJECT TO THE SAME REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AS MUTUAL FUNDS, OFTEN CHARGE HIGH FEES, AND IN MANY CASES THE UNDERLYING INVESTMENTS ARE NOT TRANSPARENT AND ARE KNOWN ONLY TO THE INVESTMENT MANAGER.
Before making any type of investment, one should consult with an investment professional to consider whether the investment is appropriate for the individuals risk profile. This is not intended to be investment advice or a solicitation to purchase any of the securities listed here. I will not be held liable or responsible for any losses or damages, monetary or otherwise that result from the content of this article.

Investment Thoughts (August 3rd, 2009): Monday, Aug 3 2009 

Not going to chase the market for a number of reasons, but most of all we should see a retest of the March lows sometime in the distant future, maybe a year or so. The US banking sector is still not healthy and has been propped up by regulatory rule changes.

So while financial stocks may be doing well at the present time they will not be the leaders in the new cycle for a variety of reasons. Among them are the mark-to-market rules, increasing non-performing loans, and difficulty in earning a solid NIM in a 0% cost of funds environment.

In order for a new bull market to begin, a new sector must take up the leadership mantle. The leaders from the previous cycle do not lead in the new cycle.

Technology is unlikely to provide leadership as R&D budgets continue to get cut. Businesses are unlikely to commit to major capital spending programs, despite a 0% interest rate environment, amidst falling revenues and uncertain consumer demand. Consumer uncertainty about the future will translate to a cautious business environment going forward.

It may sound strange to say this but with top line revenue growth falling and earnings estimates being met by cutting employees and R&D budgets, this is not a healthy sign for the future.

Without top line revenue growth earnings momentum will be difficult to maintain. You can only cut so much staff and R&D. At some point revenues need to grow and that will only come through increased consumer confidence.

When you combine an US unemployment rate that has gone from 5% to 9% and 70% of US GDP being made up of personal consumption, it is no surprise that consumer demand is weak and consumers are tightening their budgets. We will need to see strong hiring in order to get consumers feeling better about the future and opening their pocketbooks.

I am not a proponent of massive budget deficits but right now government spending is propping the US economy from falling off a cliff. This happens in every recession so there should be no surprise here.

Government spending is adding a couple of percent to GDP at the current time. A significant portion of the stimulus money is targeted to be spent in the coming years which should help the recovery. The question is how much will it affect hiring which should translate into higher tax collection as well and possibly allowing the government to meet their optimistic projections for the 2011-2012 time frame, although it is not the authors opinion that the overly optimistic projections will not be met.

The biggest question concerning the recovery should come from the balance sheet of the Federal Reserve. It is Mr. Bernanke’s intention to begin shrinking the balance sheet of the Federal Reserve in the coming years bringing it back down to a reasonable level.

The largest problem is how much will the shrinking balance sheet constrain the economic recovery. In order for the Federal Reserve to sell the securities it now holds there needs to be a buyer on the other side of the transaction. It is unlikely that the capital will come from drastically higher leverage levels at hedge funds and banks. This means the capital needs to come from either foreign governments or the private sector. Capital coming from the private sector will mean less capital for investment purposes. Capital coming from foreign governments means competition for Treasury sales.

Any recovery will be slow and grinding which is not what the bull camp wants to hear.

So what am I doing right now? Sitting on the agriculture purchases I have made over the last six months. Farmland, fruit, vegetable, and sugar production has provided a nice hedge and decent returns. There is tremendous value in the sector with some stocks already surpassing pre-crash highs.

Gold and silver should begin moving to the upside in the next few months but I am content to wait for a washout correction. This should occur about the time we get either a peak in the US Dollar, the US equity market, or both. We have yet to see a 50% retracement from last years lows which is giving me pause, although there are some interesting trades in the large cap sector.

Disclaimer
Communications are intended solely for informational purposes. Statements made should not be construed as an endorsement, either expressed or implied. This article and the author is not responsible for typographic errors or other inaccuracies in the content. This article may not be reproduced without credit or permission from the author. We believe the information contained herein to be accurate and reliable. However, errors may occasionally occur. Therefore, all information and materials are provided “AS IS” without any warranty of any kind. Past results are not indicative of future results.
PAST RESULTS ARE NOT INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS. THERE IS RISK OF LOSS AS WELL AS THE OPPORTUNITY FOR GAIN WHEN INVESTING IN THE STOCK, BOND, AND DERIVATIVE MARKETS. WHEN CONSIDERING ANY TYPE OF INVESTMENT, INCLUDING HEDGE FUNDS, YOU SHOULD CONSIDER VARIOUS RISKS INCLUDING THE FACT THAT SOME PRODUCTS: OFTEN ENGAGE IN LEVERAGING AND OTHER SPECULATIVE INVESTMENT PRACTICES THAT MAY INCREASE THE RISK OF INVESTMENT LOSS, CAN BE ILLIQUID, ARE NOT REQUIRED TO PROVIDE PERIODIC PRICING OR VALUATION INFORMATION TO INVESTORS, MAY INVOLVE COMPLEX TAX STRUCTURES AND DELAYS IN DISTRIBUTING IMPORTANT TAX INFORMATION, ARE NOT SUBJECT TO THE SAME REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AS MUTUAL FUNDS, OFTEN CHARGE HIGH FEES, AND IN MANY CASES THE UNDERLYING INVESTMENTS ARE NOT TRANSPARENT AND ARE KNOWN ONLY TO THE INVESTMENT MANAGER.
Before making any type of investment, one should consult with an investment professional to consider whether the investment is appropriate for the individuals risk profile. This is not intended to be investment advice or a solicitation to purchase any of the securities listed here. I will not be held liable or responsible for any losses or damages, monetary or otherwise that result from the content of this article.

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