Bernanke And The Fed: The Risks And Long-Term Reasons To Hold Gold And Silver Thursday, Sep 8 2011 

The markets are looking for a panacea in the form of additional quantitative easing but the leaders may not be in the mood to offer up the fix they are seeking. In Europe, leaders of both France and Germany spoke of the need for greater and tighter economic integration, insisting on balanced budgets and a strong EU with the mandate to overrule sovereign nations.

Bernanke And The Fed: The Risks And Long-Term Reasons To Hold Gold And Silver

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Alcoa: New Products to Drive Revenues Thursday, Jul 21 2011 

Alcoa: New Products to Drive Revenues

Alcoa: Sell Off Presents a Buying Opportunity Tuesday, Apr 19 2011 

Alcoa: Sell Off Presents a Buying Opportunity

Alcoa: Q1 Earnings and the Substitution Effect Make for a Bright Future Monday, Jan 31 2011 

Alcoa: Q1 Earnings and the Substitution Effect Make for a Bright Future

2011 Investment Commentary – Part 2 of 3 Friday, Jan 7 2011 

EQUITY MARKETS

After two strong years equity markets are sitting in a slightly overbought status. Technical indicators are flashing ‘pause’ and sentiment indicators are in areas which usually precede a correction. Looking back over some historical indicators there is reason to be bullish for 2011.

We are currently within the sweet spot of the four year Presidential cycle for the equity markets as the 4th Quarter of Year 2 and the first 2 quarters of Year 3 have the best returns. This means that the current rally should last into April at the very least at which time investors should look to book some profits and take money off the table.

Overlaid on the Presidential cycle is the decennial cycle in which Years ending in 1 are mostly negative.

What may cause the current rally to run out of steam? The end of Bernanke’s QE2 in the second quarter of 2011.

Valuation metrics, while on the high side are still attractive. Global multinational firms are showing strong profits on the back of a weaker dollar and increased sales penetration in the BRIC countries. Both factors should continue to drive profit growth in 2011.

Every 3rd year of the Presidential Cycle since 1939 has been positive which makes it likely that 2011 is an up year as well.

CURRENCY

The US Dollar Index is currently in a trading range with 89 being the top and 70 being the bottom. More than likely the US Dollar Index will end the year higher and closer to the 89 level although a test of the 70 level is not out of the question.

Europe will need a weaker Euro in order to help the PIIGS and refinance debt in 2011. That means a stronger US Dollar since the Euro makes up more than 50% of the US Dollar Index.

The problem with a weaker Euro is that it feeds the German export engine which pushes up German economic growth numbers which will increase calls for removing excess stimulus.

Germany has been experiencing an export boom and strong growth relative to the rest of Europe in 2010. France is experiencing strong consumer led growth as well on the backs of low interest rates. If the Euro were to begin depreciating economic growth in Germany would rise and when combined with the consumption led growth in France would begin to fan the inflationary flames across Europe.

The Dollar will continue to depreciate against most Asian and other EMEA countries. Since these countries are not part of the US Dollar Index the depreciation is invisible to those not watching the individual countries.

China will continue to encourage domestic firms to write overseas contracts in the Yuan instead of Dollars. This is a trend that started about 5 years ago and has been picking up speed. It is mostly off the radar but is important in that global firms, not just Chinese firms, are feeling more and more comfortable dealing in currencies other than the US Dollar.

HARD COMMODITIES

As we enter 2011 precious metals demand will continue to increase driven by the buildout of EMEA economies.

The easy money, however, has already been made in this cycle and investors would be well served to play the substitution effect as high commodity prices for precious metals such as Gold, Copper, Tin, and Platinum will force industrial users to switch to alternative and cheaper metals.

One particular example is Copper whose primary use in electrical wires and residential piping is well known. At $9,000 it becomes more effective for industrial users to substitute Aluminum in electrical wiring and PVC piping in residential pipes. Given the high inventories and lagging price for Aluminum versus Copper there is a good chance the Aluminum outperforms Copper in 2011.

This story should play out across the commodity spectrum as the year goes on.

It is a bit worrisome that so many investors are on one side of a trade, especially with respect to certain hard commodities. When this happens demand destruction and substitution begins to take effect causing a ripple effect across the commodity spectrum.

Gold and Silver should continue to see a flight from investors worldwide seeking a security marking another year of strong gains after a small correction in January.

Oil will continue to climb, moderately, on the back of a strengthening global economy.

Natural gas prices will be constrained my weather and strong production issues. While there may be a strong rally to start the year prices should fall back over the summer months.

FIXED INCOME

The fixed income bubble is continuing with the markets moving from consumer debt, whose debt bubble popped in 2008, to sovereign debt and eventually to corporate debt which will lead to a corporate recession preceded by a mergers and acquisition boom in which corporations lever up their balance sheets and put the enormous amounts of cash to work.

We are likely to see a move upward in fixed income yields as long as QE2 is in effect. Once QE2 ends however, traders will move back into the fixed income space creating a solid rally.

SOFT COMMODITIES

Agriculture will do the best amongst commodities. By agriculture I mean companies that actually grow and harvest their own crops.

The strong La Nina is still in effect and should remain so throughout the year. It will begin easing up shortly but return towards the end of the year.

This means a wetter than expected rust belt and drier than expected southeast and southwest in the United States.

In Asia this will likely mean a dryer than normal northern China and a wetter than normal Southeast Asia and Australia.

The Mount Merapi eruption will not have a major effect on Asian agriculture as the ash that was thrown up into the atmosphere was of a low sulfur content.

Green energy begins to heat up once again as the oil price moves higher.

Disclaimer
Communications are intended solely for informational purposes. Statements made should not be construed as an endorsement, either expressed or implied. This article and the author is not responsible for typographic errors or other inaccuracies in the content. This article may not be reproduced without credit or permission from the author. We believe the information contained herein to be accurate and reliable. However, errors may occasionally occur. Therefore, all information and materials are provided “AS IS” without any warranty of any kind. Past results are not indicative of future results.
PAST RESULTS ARE NOT INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS. THERE IS RISK OF LOSS AS WELL AS THE OPPORTUNITY FOR GAIN WHEN INVESTING IN THE STOCK, BOND, AND DERIVATIVE MARKETS. WHEN CONSIDERING ANY TYPE OF INVESTMENT, INCLUDING HEDGE FUNDS, YOU SHOULD CONSIDER VARIOUS RISKS INCLUDING THE FACT THAT SOME PRODUCTS: OFTEN ENGAGE IN LEVERAGING AND OTHER SPECULATIVE INVESTMENT PRACTICES THAT MAY INCREASE THE RISK OF INVESTMENT LOSS, CAN BE ILLIQUID, ARE NOT REQUIRED TO PROVIDE PERIODIC PRICING OR VALUATION INFORMATION TO INVESTORS, MAY INVOLVE COMPLEX TAX STRUCTURES AND DELAYS IN DISTRIBUTING IMPORTANT TAX INFORMATION, ARE NOT SUBJECT TO THE SAME REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AS MUTUAL FUNDS, OFTEN CHARGE HIGH FEES, AND IN MANY CASES THE UNDERLYING INVESTMENTS ARE NOT TRANSPARENT AND ARE KNOWN ONLY TO THE INVESTMENT MANAGER.
Before making any type of investment, one should consult with an investment professional to consider whether the investment is appropriate for the individuals risk profile. This is not intended to be investment advice or a solicitation to purchase any of the securities listed here. I will not be held liable or responsible for any losses or damages, monetary or otherwise that result from the content of this article.

Commodities Thoughts – October 7, 2010 Thursday, Oct 7 2010 

Gold has broken out to new highs over the past few weeks on rumors of the Federal Reserve coming to market with QE2 and continued troubles in Europe and Japan.

The current price action reminds me of the December time frame when Gold ran up only to pull back by 10%. Todays selloff is confirming my thoughts that we may be at a short-term top in Gold and investors should tighten stops and get ready to deploy capital. Important support is at the 1250-1265 level.

Silver has moved higher along with Gold as increased demand from investors looking to get access to Gold’s cheaper cousin.

For the past year, Silver has been trapped in a trading range but this breakout is significant as it implies higher prices down the road once the current runup has been digested.

Silver is likely to pull back from here and underperform Gold over short-term time horizon. Investors would be best served to tighten up stops and look for the bottom of the new trading range before allocating capital at this time.

Both charts are seriously overbought so investors should take pause before entering into any long position at this time.

Disclaimer
Communications are intended solely for informational purposes. Statements made should not be construed as an endorsement, either expressed or implied. This article and the author is not responsible for typographic errors or other inaccuracies in the content. This article may not be reproduced without credit or permission from the author. We believe the information contained herein to be accurate and reliable. However, errors may occasionally occur. Therefore, all information and materials are provided “AS IS” without any warranty of any kind. Past results are not indicative of future results.
PAST RESULTS ARE NOT INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS. THERE IS RISK OF LOSS AS WELL AS THE OPPORTUNITY FOR GAIN WHEN INVESTING IN THE STOCK, BOND, AND DERIVATIVE MARKETS. WHEN CONSIDERING ANY TYPE OF INVESTMENT, INCLUDING HEDGE FUNDS, YOU SHOULD CONSIDER VARIOUS RISKS INCLUDING THE FACT THAT SOME PRODUCTS: OFTEN ENGAGE IN LEVERAGING AND OTHER SPECULATIVE INVESTMENT PRACTICES THAT MAY INCREASE THE RISK OF INVESTMENT LOSS, CAN BE ILLIQUID, ARE NOT REQUIRED TO PROVIDE PERIODIC PRICING OR VALUATION INFORMATION TO INVESTORS, MAY INVOLVE COMPLEX TAX STRUCTURES AND DELAYS IN DISTRIBUTING IMPORTANT TAX INFORMATION, ARE NOT SUBJECT TO THE SAME REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AS MUTUAL FUNDS, OFTEN CHARGE HIGH FEES, AND IN MANY CASES THE UNDERLYING INVESTMENTS ARE NOT TRANSPARENT AND ARE KNOWN ONLY TO THE INVESTMENT MANAGER.
Before making any type of investment, one should consult with an investment professional to consider whether the investment is appropriate for the individuals risk profile. This is not intended to be investment advice or a solicitation to purchase any of the securities listed here. I will not be held liable or responsible for any losses or damages, monetary or otherwise that result from the content of this article.

Commodity Thoughts – September 3, 2010 Friday, Sep 3 2010 

Oil (WTIC) – We are stuck in a trading range between approximately $68 and $78 a barrel while economic trends resolve themselves. As an oil bull this looks like a base but a long-term base pattern which will lead us higher at some point in the future.

At this point in time oil equities are more interesting than Oil ETF’s due to their strong cash positions and high dividend yields. The dividend yields give the stocks a nice cushion in the event of a downturn in the market.

Natural Gas – Seasonal pattern are in effect here with Natural Gas trading lower in the summer months as inventories are replenished ahead of the winter season when stocks get drawn down. The chart may look ugly but it is seasonal ugly. Still not a time to go long.

Copper – Copper is trading near the top of its historical range which should give investors pause. Seasonal effects may begin to take effect as the 8000 level (~400 on the chart) is a major resistance level at which point the demand dynamic changes considerably irrespective of supply.

Disclaimer
Communications are intended solely for informational purposes. Statements made should not be construed as an endorsement, either expressed or implied. This article and the author is not responsible for typographic errors or other inaccuracies in the content. This article may not be reproduced without credit or permission from the author. We believe the information contained herein to be accurate and reliable. However, errors may occasionally occur. Therefore, all information and materials are provided “AS IS” without any warranty of any kind. Past results are not indicative of future results.
PAST RESULTS ARE NOT INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS. THERE IS RISK OF LOSS AS WELL AS THE OPPORTUNITY FOR GAIN WHEN INVESTING IN THE STOCK, BOND, AND DERIVATIVE MARKETS. WHEN CONSIDERING ANY TYPE OF INVESTMENT, INCLUDING HEDGE FUNDS, YOU SHOULD CONSIDER VARIOUS RISKS INCLUDING THE FACT THAT SOME PRODUCTS: OFTEN ENGAGE IN LEVERAGING AND OTHER SPECULATIVE INVESTMENT PRACTICES THAT MAY INCREASE THE RISK OF INVESTMENT LOSS, CAN BE ILLIQUID, ARE NOT REQUIRED TO PROVIDE PERIODIC PRICING OR VALUATION INFORMATION TO INVESTORS, MAY INVOLVE COMPLEX TAX STRUCTURES AND DELAYS IN DISTRIBUTING IMPORTANT TAX INFORMATION, ARE NOT SUBJECT TO THE SAME REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AS MUTUAL FUNDS, OFTEN CHARGE HIGH FEES, AND IN MANY CASES THE UNDERLYING INVESTMENTS ARE NOT TRANSPARENT AND ARE KNOWN ONLY TO THE INVESTMENT MANAGER.
Before making any type of investment, one should consult with an investment professional to consider whether the investment is appropriate for the individuals risk profile. This is not intended to be investment advice or a solicitation to purchase any of the securities listed here. I will not be held liable or responsible for any losses or damages, monetary or otherwise that result from the content of this article.

Gold in Uncharted Territory Friday, Oct 9 2009 

Many reasons have been given for the rise in Gold this week but overlooked by the mainstream press is an important point; the beginning of the 2010 United States fiscal year. Spending is expected to balloon to upwards of $3.55 trillion dollars with a budget deficit of $1.75 trillion dollars.

It is clear that the next bubble is not in US Treasuries but in the US Government itself. Under Bush II, government was allowed to expand far in excess of what was necessary. Discretionary spending exploded and deficits were allowed to run rampant. Sprinkle in a massive increase in US Treasury issuance along with artificially low interest rates, a touch of monetary supply growth while interest rates were being increased, the collapse of the US real estate market severely weakening the US banking system, and you sow the seeds for the massive increase in government spending we have today.

Two points are certain at this moment in time.

The first is that the United States, with the amount of debt outstanding and coming down the pipeline, is not able to undertake a policy of raising interest rates from these low levels to normalized levels for a number of years.

The second point is that Gold will only go higher from here over the next 6 month period with a spike in price during the March-May time frame after which we trade sideways for at least a year in order to digest the run higher and the increase in gold supply coming on market from new mines coming into production.

The peak in Gold should coincide with a peak in Silver as well along with a test of the USD lows made last year.

We should remember that Penasquito, Goldcorp’s massive mine in Mexico, is scheduled to come into commercial production in January of 2010 as well. This supply of gold, silver, and zinc should be enough to keep each market in a sideways range for some time until the supply is properly digested.

Disclaimer
Communications are intended solely for informational purposes. Statements made should not be construed as an endorsement, either expressed or implied. This article and the author is not responsible for typographic errors or other inaccuracies in the content. This article may not be reproduced without credit or permission from the author. We believe the information contained herein to be accurate and reliable. However, errors may occasionally occur. Therefore, all information and materials are provided “AS IS” without any warranty of any kind. Past results are not indicative of future results.
PAST RESULTS ARE NOT INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS. THERE IS RISK OF LOSS AS WELL AS THE OPPORTUNITY FOR GAIN WHEN INVESTING IN THE STOCK, BOND, AND DERIVATIVE MARKETS. WHEN CONSIDERING ANY TYPE OF INVESTMENT, INCLUDING HEDGE FUNDS, YOU SHOULD CONSIDER VARIOUS RISKS INCLUDING THE FACT THAT SOME PRODUCTS: OFTEN ENGAGE IN LEVERAGING AND OTHER SPECULATIVE INVESTMENT PRACTICES THAT MAY INCREASE THE RISK OF INVESTMENT LOSS, CAN BE ILLIQUID, ARE NOT REQUIRED TO PROVIDE PERIODIC PRICING OR VALUATION INFORMATION TO INVESTORS, MAY INVOLVE COMPLEX TAX STRUCTURES AND DELAYS IN DISTRIBUTING IMPORTANT TAX INFORMATION, ARE NOT SUBJECT TO THE SAME REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AS MUTUAL FUNDS, OFTEN CHARGE HIGH FEES, AND IN MANY CASES THE UNDERLYING INVESTMENTS ARE NOT TRANSPARENT AND ARE KNOWN ONLY TO THE INVESTMENT MANAGER.
Before making any type of investment, one should consult with an investment professional to consider whether the investment is appropriate for the individuals risk profile. This is not intended to be investment advice or a solicitation to purchase any of the securities listed here. I will not be held liable or responsible for any losses or damages, monetary or otherwise that result from the content of this article.

4th Quarter Investment Thoughts Thursday, Oct 1 2009 

I would like to start by making a comment on my last article. Globally, there are values in financial stocks in countries not hit as hard as the US and Europe. My bearish stance is US based, not global.

If one takes the time to look they can find good values, especially in Asia and Canada where banks are lending and making solid profits.

Recent home sales numbers were positive. Inventories are being cleared from the system; which given the new wave of resets is a very good sign. There is a question of what will happen in 2010 when the tax credits expire. I have a pretty good idea on how this plays out in the coming year but would like to see more data before my thesis gets solidified. In the meantime, if sales and inventories continue to fall, properties in the grey market will likely come online. The faster this glut of grey market properties work their way through the system the quicker we can return to normal.

The scenario is similar to how tech companies had to wait for equipment purchased by dot.coms who went bust to work their way through the system in 2001 and 2002 before they started to see any growth.

The recent pullback in gold and silver is a pause that refreshes. Gold seems to be tracking the dollar which is headed for a retest of the lows made in 2008 which retested lows made in the 1980’s. The key is what happens next year during the period of time when we retest. Do we dare look back to what happened more than 25 years ago? I have a pretty good idea how this scenario plays out through 2010 but once again need to see more data before my thesis become solidified.

Neutral to bearish in hard commodities. There are some seasonal factors at play here and the technical charts do not look strong at all. An upside breakout would turn me into a bull but I believe each metal, with the exception of gold and silver, needs to take a break and reassess its fundamentals vis-a-vis stockpiles and supply-demand fundamentals.

Agriculture stocks continue to provided fantastic value and returns if you are willing to do your homework.

Sugar should underperform relative to other soft commodities.

The broader market is likely headed higher after a correction but there are better returns elsewhere outside the major indexes. The next group has yet to emerge and assume leadership in the market so what we are seeing is not the beginning of a bull market but rather a correction in a long-term (decadinal) sideways movement.

The Fed statement spoke about extending the mortgage securities purchase program into the first quarter of next year. This is an admission that they will not be able to wind down this program as fast as programs like TALF.

Rates will end up staying low in the Unites States much longer than people expect. I believe that those looking for a rate hike in 2010 will be disappointed.

The real question going forward in monetary policy is ‘Who globally will lead the charge to raise rates?’

Disclaimer
Communications are intended solely for informational purposes. Statements made should not be construed as an endorsement, either expressed or implied. This article and the author is not responsible for typographic errors or other inaccuracies in the content. This article may not be reproduced without credit or permission from the author. We believe the information contained herein to be accurate and reliable. However, errors may occasionally occur. Therefore, all information and materials are provided “AS IS” without any warranty of any kind. Past results are not indicative of future results.
PAST RESULTS ARE NOT INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS. THERE IS RISK OF LOSS AS WELL AS THE OPPORTUNITY FOR GAIN WHEN INVESTING IN THE STOCK, BOND, AND DERIVATIVE MARKETS. WHEN CONSIDERING ANY TYPE OF INVESTMENT, INCLUDING HEDGE FUNDS, YOU SHOULD CONSIDER VARIOUS RISKS INCLUDING THE FACT THAT SOME PRODUCTS: OFTEN ENGAGE IN LEVERAGING AND OTHER SPECULATIVE INVESTMENT PRACTICES THAT MAY INCREASE THE RISK OF INVESTMENT LOSS, CAN BE ILLIQUID, ARE NOT REQUIRED TO PROVIDE PERIODIC PRICING OR VALUATION INFORMATION TO INVESTORS, MAY INVOLVE COMPLEX TAX STRUCTURES AND DELAYS IN DISTRIBUTING IMPORTANT TAX INFORMATION, ARE NOT SUBJECT TO THE SAME REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AS MUTUAL FUNDS, OFTEN CHARGE HIGH FEES, AND IN MANY CASES THE UNDERLYING INVESTMENTS ARE NOT TRANSPARENT AND ARE KNOWN ONLY TO THE INVESTMENT MANAGER.
Before making any type of investment, one should consult with an investment professional to consider whether the investment is appropriate for the individuals risk profile. This is not intended to be investment advice or a solicitation to purchase any of the securities listed here. I will not be held liable or responsible for any losses or damages, monetary or otherwise that result from the content of this article.

Investment Thoughts (August 3rd, 2009): Monday, Aug 3 2009 

Not going to chase the market for a number of reasons, but most of all we should see a retest of the March lows sometime in the distant future, maybe a year or so. The US banking sector is still not healthy and has been propped up by regulatory rule changes.

So while financial stocks may be doing well at the present time they will not be the leaders in the new cycle for a variety of reasons. Among them are the mark-to-market rules, increasing non-performing loans, and difficulty in earning a solid NIM in a 0% cost of funds environment.

In order for a new bull market to begin, a new sector must take up the leadership mantle. The leaders from the previous cycle do not lead in the new cycle.

Technology is unlikely to provide leadership as R&D budgets continue to get cut. Businesses are unlikely to commit to major capital spending programs, despite a 0% interest rate environment, amidst falling revenues and uncertain consumer demand. Consumer uncertainty about the future will translate to a cautious business environment going forward.

It may sound strange to say this but with top line revenue growth falling and earnings estimates being met by cutting employees and R&D budgets, this is not a healthy sign for the future.

Without top line revenue growth earnings momentum will be difficult to maintain. You can only cut so much staff and R&D. At some point revenues need to grow and that will only come through increased consumer confidence.

When you combine an US unemployment rate that has gone from 5% to 9% and 70% of US GDP being made up of personal consumption, it is no surprise that consumer demand is weak and consumers are tightening their budgets. We will need to see strong hiring in order to get consumers feeling better about the future and opening their pocketbooks.

I am not a proponent of massive budget deficits but right now government spending is propping the US economy from falling off a cliff. This happens in every recession so there should be no surprise here.

Government spending is adding a couple of percent to GDP at the current time. A significant portion of the stimulus money is targeted to be spent in the coming years which should help the recovery. The question is how much will it affect hiring which should translate into higher tax collection as well and possibly allowing the government to meet their optimistic projections for the 2011-2012 time frame, although it is not the authors opinion that the overly optimistic projections will not be met.

The biggest question concerning the recovery should come from the balance sheet of the Federal Reserve. It is Mr. Bernanke’s intention to begin shrinking the balance sheet of the Federal Reserve in the coming years bringing it back down to a reasonable level.

The largest problem is how much will the shrinking balance sheet constrain the economic recovery. In order for the Federal Reserve to sell the securities it now holds there needs to be a buyer on the other side of the transaction. It is unlikely that the capital will come from drastically higher leverage levels at hedge funds and banks. This means the capital needs to come from either foreign governments or the private sector. Capital coming from the private sector will mean less capital for investment purposes. Capital coming from foreign governments means competition for Treasury sales.

Any recovery will be slow and grinding which is not what the bull camp wants to hear.

So what am I doing right now? Sitting on the agriculture purchases I have made over the last six months. Farmland, fruit, vegetable, and sugar production has provided a nice hedge and decent returns. There is tremendous value in the sector with some stocks already surpassing pre-crash highs.

Gold and silver should begin moving to the upside in the next few months but I am content to wait for a washout correction. This should occur about the time we get either a peak in the US Dollar, the US equity market, or both. We have yet to see a 50% retracement from last years lows which is giving me pause, although there are some interesting trades in the large cap sector.

Disclaimer
Communications are intended solely for informational purposes. Statements made should not be construed as an endorsement, either expressed or implied. This article and the author is not responsible for typographic errors or other inaccuracies in the content. This article may not be reproduced without credit or permission from the author. We believe the information contained herein to be accurate and reliable. However, errors may occasionally occur. Therefore, all information and materials are provided “AS IS” without any warranty of any kind. Past results are not indicative of future results.
PAST RESULTS ARE NOT INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS. THERE IS RISK OF LOSS AS WELL AS THE OPPORTUNITY FOR GAIN WHEN INVESTING IN THE STOCK, BOND, AND DERIVATIVE MARKETS. WHEN CONSIDERING ANY TYPE OF INVESTMENT, INCLUDING HEDGE FUNDS, YOU SHOULD CONSIDER VARIOUS RISKS INCLUDING THE FACT THAT SOME PRODUCTS: OFTEN ENGAGE IN LEVERAGING AND OTHER SPECULATIVE INVESTMENT PRACTICES THAT MAY INCREASE THE RISK OF INVESTMENT LOSS, CAN BE ILLIQUID, ARE NOT REQUIRED TO PROVIDE PERIODIC PRICING OR VALUATION INFORMATION TO INVESTORS, MAY INVOLVE COMPLEX TAX STRUCTURES AND DELAYS IN DISTRIBUTING IMPORTANT TAX INFORMATION, ARE NOT SUBJECT TO THE SAME REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AS MUTUAL FUNDS, OFTEN CHARGE HIGH FEES, AND IN MANY CASES THE UNDERLYING INVESTMENTS ARE NOT TRANSPARENT AND ARE KNOWN ONLY TO THE INVESTMENT MANAGER.
Before making any type of investment, one should consult with an investment professional to consider whether the investment is appropriate for the individuals risk profile. This is not intended to be investment advice or a solicitation to purchase any of the securities listed here. I will not be held liable or responsible for any losses or damages, monetary or otherwise that result from the content of this article.